test prep (starts early)

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/07/26/education/26winerip.html?hpw

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3 responses to this post.

    • I haven’t gotten a chance to listen but my guess based off of the synopsis and having read Outliers is that he thinks that working hard/mastery is much more important than being anointed as gifted. I can see both pros and cons of gifted ed, but there’s no question that students who get access to those types of classes are privvy to special resources (smaller class sizes, more individualized attention, etc.) that will likely work to their benefit (http://www.nytimes.com/2010/07/28/business/economy/28leonhardt.html?src=me&ref=homepage)

      Reply

      • Posted by Jibril on July 29, 2010 at 1:31 pm

        You were spot on. He basically makes the case that what passes for genius is really little more than the dedication and love a person has for a certain field. He doesn’t go as far as to dismiss the idea of natural talent, but he diminishes its importance. I thought of the link I shared as soon as I read the first article you posted because the way they go about discussing the same problem, yet arrive at different opinions of what role gifted programs should play in education seemed similar to a common economics debate debate. One side arguing that economics should be seen in a pure sense where the outcomes of the market leads to the best or most efficient distribution of resources and shouldn’t be burdened by social considerations, while the other side argues that the economy can’t be separated from obligations to the welfare of the entire society. I’m not sure how analogous this is to split over gifted programs, but it seemed worth mentioning. (By the way, sorry for making this comment so long.)

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